PimgMeI remember clearly the first time I heard the term FOMO. I thought “here we go again, one more new acronym to learn.” I was watching a show on HULU about Millennials.

One young lady spent literally hours posting and responding to posts about The Hunger Games. All the time investment was so that she could win a prize.

She just sat in her bedroom doing this  for hours and she won the prize as the Biggest Fan! I wondered if her parents knew what she was doing.

I learned that the company that markets The Hunger Games knew what was going on as they capitalized on her earnest commitment to the movie franchise.

FOMO, “Fear Of Missing Out” is supported by many apps. The smartphone, iPad, and computer are constantly pinging us to keep us updated on what our “friends” are doing.

CIC Syndrome (Comparison Inferiority Complex©) combined with FOMO has the world in its grips and refuses to release us.

The Mindfulness app was recommended to me by a friend in Atlanta who knows I am interested in such things.

After the first month I had to delete the app as it was constantly pinging me with reminders. In the middle of teaching a class I would hear a ping, forget about it and there would be another ping. That kind of constant pinging is not my idea of mindfulness.

Facebook has begun to provide twice monthly updates oi their phone app. I noticed two new disturbances:

  1. It pings every time someone does an update or responds to anything you have also responded to.
  2. The iPad version now pings when you press enter. I tell you it’s annoying as hell and I for one don’t like it.

LinkedIn is joining the bandwagon by pinging every time something happens with someone you are connected to. In the event you, like me, have turned off the pinging in an effort to be more productive and practice time management, they reach out with an email regarding an article you have written or with encouragement to update your company page.

Free Work – What this boils down to is these companies are getting free labor from millions of people all over the world. They are using the FOMO trend and CIC Syndrome© to gain an advantage in the marketplace.

Each of these companies have an algorithm running in the back end of their website that captures the activity of their members. They then use that information to market and sell to members and their friends.

Additionally, the constant pinging is a Time Thief and scurries away with pieces of us on a daily basis. And we, mere puppets, caught in the grips of FOMO willingly give ourselves up to them sacrificing our daily lives on the altar of their bank accounts.

How about you? Are you ready to cease behaving like Pavlov’s dogs constantly responding to little bells, and taking back control of your life and your time?

Then PUT DOWN THAT PHONE! Turn off the push notification elements of your apps and step outside to smell the roses.

As always your comments are welcome.

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

PalmerLuckey

Palmer Luckey Virtual Reality

Virtual reality has been in movies for awhile. In fact, my first exposure to virtual reality was in the 1983 movie “Brainstorm” starring Natalie Wood and Christopher Walken. Here’s the plot: “Brilliant researchers Lillian Reynolds and Michael Brace have developed a system of recording and playing back actual experiences of people.”

It works so well that it soon becomes obvious that the government is interested in more than just missile guidance systems. The lab starts producing mind torture recordings and other psychosis inducing material.

One of the things I remember from that movie is how one of the characters wound up a twitching, nearly brain dead shell of himself, after wearing the headset for a record number of hours. You see, he had spliced together erotic scenes and watched them nonstop.

This is not unlike today’s gamers who play an online game non-stop and sometimes cause harm to themselves from lack of sleep and nourishment.

My second exposure to virtual reality was in the 1990 movie “Total Recall” starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone. The plot of the movie is about a man who goes for virtual vacation memories of the planet Mars, then an unexpected and harrowing series of events forces him to go to the planet for real, or does he?

Palmer-Luckey-and-Oculus-Rift

Peter Luckey and Oculus Rift

In 1983 and in 1990 virtual reality seemed futuristic.

Enter Palmer Luckey. He wasn’t a striving Stanford grad or dot-com refugee; he was an obsessed teen, son of a Long Beach car salesman and stay-at-home mom.

The Luckeys chose to homeschool the precocious Palmer and his three sisters. In doing so, they encouraged them to pursue their passions.

His passion led him to invent the virtual reality headset. He started making virtual reality headsets when he was 16.

At 19 he founded his company, Oculus VR.

At 21 he sold it to Facebook for $2 billion, despite the fact that it had practically no revenue, or even a commercial product–it was little more than a prototype.

Now, just 22 years old, Palmer Luckey is on the verge of doing what generations of technologists before him tried and failed–bringing virtual reality to the masses.

I chose him to be my first blog post of 2015 not only for his entrepreneurship, but also as a commendation on his parents ability to raise and home school this genius.

Your comments as always are welcome.

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

Ms. Taylor Swift

For days I have been thinking about what I want to write for my blog post for the Generational Differences in the Age of Social Media blog then I awoke this morning with these wishes for my millennial and digital babies worldwide:

1. Learn about romantic love. While watching a movie recently it ended with a love song and as I listened to the words I realized that no one write words like that anymore. If they do, the music is not part of the stream of music I hear on the radio or in department stores.

Rather the air is filled with negative lyrics like Nicki Minaj’s “you a stupid hoe” a song that repeats that sentence over and over again. Now imagine your daughter listening to that pounding in her head over the headphones.

It is for this very reason that Taylor Swift is so popular today. Her lyrics are uplifting, filled with self esteem, and fun.NikkiMinaj

2. Revere your bodies and protect them. Thanks to the Kardashians and the media, women’s bodies have been reduced to pieces of meat offered up for consumption worldwide.

Young women are encouraged to get “boob jobs” and “butt implants” in order to be accepted as beautiful. Let 2015 be the year you learn what Mohammed Ali said to his daughters after seeing one oft hem dressed inappropriately:

“My father took a good look at us. Then he sat me down on his lap and said something that I will never forget. He looked me straight in the eyes and said, “Hana, everything that God made valuable in the world is covered and hard to get to. Where do you find diamonds? Deep down in the ground, covered and protected. Where do you find pearls? Deep down at the bottom of the ocean, covered up and protected in a beautiful shell. Where do you find gold? Way down in the mine, covered over with layers and layers of rock. You’ve got to work hard to get to them.”

He looked at me with serious eyes. “Your body is sacred. You’re far more precious than diamonds and pearls, and you should be covered too.” Source: Taken from the book: More Than A Hero: Muhammad Ali’s Life Lessons Through His Daughter’s Eyes.”

I added it here in its entirety so that if you wish, you can share it with your daughters as well.

3. Get your degree in a field that will still exist when you graduate from college. I have noticed of late that many of the degrees being proided by universities are for professions that at no longer valid. There are new industries cropping up all over the world that academia has not yet tapped into.

I highly recommend that digital babies (if it’s not digital it does not compute for these guys) take a few steps back and rethink your strategy for your career. To help you figure it out, invite you to listen to my radio show for February titled “Is a College Education Still Worth It?”  The show is Find Yourself, Live Your Dreams, and Be Happywhich is what I wish for you in 2015.

4. Don’t just hook up. Go out on dates with the people you like. Many of you started “hooking up” at an early age and have no idea what a real date is. That’s when the guy picks you up, takes you out, and you spend time together talking and getting to know each other.

I recently watched an episode of the “Steve Harvey Show” where he tried to help an young lady with a date. The date was in a very nice restaurant, by the window, sweet view. She never noticed it because she spent her time texting with her friend about the date.

She even took a picture of the poor guy and sent it to her friend for her approval. Meanwhile, the guy was right in front of her and she said less than 20 words to him.

When Steve Harvey asked her what that’s about she replied, “I’m 23 that’s what we do.”

Look up once in awhile and know that hooking up with a guy damages your brand, your reputation, and eventually your self esteem.

5. Go for an enlightening, loving and joyous 2015. It’s time to create a new you. If you need some help with that, use the contact tab to send me a note. I will be happy to provide some coaching to get you started. I love you guys!

Your comments as always are welcome.

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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Malala

Malala

By now you know that “It’s easy for us to recognize that a 17 year-old-girl who survived a terror attack against her life and against education for women, and that has spread the word about vital issues widely, receiving increasing support for her cause, deserves to be lauded with such a prize”

Malala was shot by the Taliban for trying to get an education. To her parents credit, they supported her in her quest for education. It has paid off tremendously and encouraged young women the world over to aspire to getting an education.

I commend her on her accomplishment.

There is an organization that I want to tell you about that also helps young women in the United States that you should know about. It is the Young Women’s Leadership Network.

Their mission statement is “YWLN supports two life-changing programs that empower students to break the cycle of poverty through education: ”

Check out this video of what they are all about:

To Malala and these young women I say “Keep up the good work.”

Reach for the stars, get your education, and change the world.

Your comments as always are welcome.

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

It’s been awhile since I wrote a blog post and there’s a good reason for that. I am happy to share that I have been busy working on my American Dream and presenting seminars to some wonderful corporate clients.

As I tell my attendees, one of the reasons I write this blog is to counteract the media’s focus on the negative when it comes to the younger generation.

I continue looking for young people inventing and creating businesses and have another one to share with you this month.

 

MikeZhang

I am always on the lookout for young people dreaming and creating their own businesses and their own life. So I was thrilled to find Mike Zhang who at age 23 became a millionaire when he sold the company he founded at age 14 after convincing his parents to let him import products from China and sell them online.

Like many other millionaire entrepreneurs, Zhang dropped out of college to bring his dream to life.

When he sold his company in 2012, it was generating more than $20 million in revenue.

One of the things we seldom consider when young people sell their companies, is that the wealth managers descend upon them like vultures.

From Goldman Sachs, to Credit Suisse, to Merrill Lynch, the “greed is good” crowd pursued Mike in an effort to woo his business.

It was a mistake of course. Zhang, who sold the business in 2012 and is now 23 years old said “when I have a rainy day, I don’t want to talk to an opportunist.”

Instead, he gave his business to a long time supporter and friend Andrew Palmer, managing director at Bel Air Investment Advisers.

Like many successful entrepreneurs before him, Zhang had vision and an ability to connect the dots. He saw a market opportunity and took it.

Kudos to his parents for helping him to execute on the idea. I bet they are proud the result.

Like many other young, successful entrepreneurs he is not done yet. Very few of them sell their business and retire and Zhang is no different. He is on to his next project already and I for one am very excited about his next entrepreneurial move in the marketplace www.retailops.com.

As always, your comments are welcome.

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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What does a typical eight year old girl do in today’s society. According to the media, she spends her time online, texts and mulitasks with her friends. She might be thinking about boys and giggling with her besties and that’s fine.

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Madison Robinson and her Flip Flops

This month I want to share with you how one eight year old loved her way to millions.

Madison Robinson had a simple idea. She loves flip flops, drawing, and she loves the sea. So she started thinking of how to combine her three loves.

So she approached her dad with the idea of starting business.

Soon she was producing drawing for her fish – flip flop ideas. Then she came up with the name “Fish Flops.”

Impressed, her dad immediately bought the domain name fishflops.com.

Demonstrating tenacity, Madison followed up with her father a few months later and it was at that time, that he began putting the company together.

In 2011 father and daughter attended their first trade show with some product samples on hand.

At the end of the show they had over 30 orders from stores that agreed to carry the Fish Flops.

Fast forward a few years and Madison, now a 15 years old entrepreneur, has over $1 million in sales and the business is growing.

“Her product line has exploded into an all-out brand, featuring hats, t-shirts, kids books she writes herself and what appears to be an upcoming video game or app that takes place under the sea. Holy hamburgers, this kid’s got moxy!”

Check out this video about her:



This Forbes Magazine article  proves that she is on the way to a great future.

Now it’s clear that the youth of today are tenacious, creative, and entrepreneurial.

The shoes go for about $25 a pair and Robinson has sold more than 60,000. Word on the street is that she is designing a new line for adults for Macys.

I think her college fund is ready for when that day comes.

It’s not surprising that she wants to study business when she attends college.

 

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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MayorAjaBrownEveryone seems to be getting on the bandwagon speaking about the five generations in the workplace these day.  It’s catching on.

I know because I recently received invitations to three different programs on this topic in one day.

I started speaking on the multi-generational workforce long before it caught on and have done extensive research on the topic.

What I have found is reflected on my blog “Generational Differences in the Age of Social Media” and as readers have noted, I often seek out positive occurrences of Gen Y contributions to society.

Today I draw your attention to two opposite examples of Gen Y behavior.

You’re paying for my vacation so suck it

In the first instance the father of a young woman won his age discrimination lawsuit. According to Cnn.com “Patrick Snay, 69 — the former head of Gulliver Preparatory School — filed an age discrimination complaint when his 2010-11 contract wasn’t renewed.” Gulliver schools paid $10,000 in back pay, an $80,000 settlement, and they also cut a check for his attorney’s fees of $60,000.

There was only one thing they had to do, maintain the integrity of the confidentiality agreement and not speak about it to anyone.

His daughter not only blasted it out to her 1,200 Facebook friends, she wrote “Mama and Papa Snay won the case against Gulliver. Gulliver is now officially paying for my vacation to Europe this summer. SUCK IT.”

The laugh is on her and her family as they can now “suck it.”

The judge in the Third District Court of Appeal for the State of Florida agreed that Snay had, in fact, violated the confidentiality agreement and just like that, he reversed the Circuit Court ruling.

So no vacation to Europe and a big lesson learned for the Snay family who now get zero dollars.

Something tells me she has not learned her lesson and may continue to post on social media.

Now there’s a Gen Y Mayor of Compton, California

Then I found another hope for the future. Not all Gen Y people are looking for awards and behaving badly on Facebook and other social media platforms. Some are looking at sociey and their world and thinking “I can do that. I can make a difference.”

It was with joy that I found Maria Schriver’s story about a young woman who is now the mayor of Compton. It demonstrates and underscores that not all Gen Y people are the same.

We could look at them through different lens and be joyful at what we learn about them.

“I believe that if other cities can transform, Compton can do the same,” says Mayor Aja Brown, the 31-year old USC grad who assumed leadership of the city following a landslide election last June.

In Maria Shriver’s article Aja Brown talks about her thoughts on Compton’s potential, the power of women leaders, and the invaluable lessons of her mother.

This amazing young woman works with her husband as a youth mentor and says “I let kids know that they have a golden opportunity to chase their life in any direction that they choose to, and that with hard work, determination, and a plan for their life, they can really be successful. And that sacrifice is really key to any success.”

Raised by a single parent, her thoughts about leadership include “a belief that being a servant leader is really important; and by servant I mean really looking at ways to increase the capacity and the achievement of the people that I’m working with.”

I encourage you to read the entire interview with Maria Shriver to learn more about this incredible young woman.

These two stories demonstrate the variety of mindset of today’s millennials.

One displays irreverence and irresponsible behavior, and the other looks at her community and society to identify ways in which she can make a difference.

I recommend we resolve to view members of the Millennial generation as individuals and refrain from lumping them into the whole.

They are growing up and deserve the opportunity to be measured on their individual works rather than our perceptions of them.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your employees, students, and social media tribe.  Help me spread the word!

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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Teen Turns Idea into Multi-Million Dollar Business

Bella has an idea

I am always on the lookout for positive, uplifting stories and ideas from today’s youth.

That’s because the media tends to focus on the negative and sensationalize bad behavior.

This month I have the story of a young woman from Arizona named Isabella “Bella” Weems who built an immensely successful businesses as a response to being told no by her parents.

Here’s the thing, all she wanted was a used car.

According to Forbes Magazine “At 14 Weems announced that she felt a car would be an appropriate gift for her 16th birthday, but was told by her parents, Chrissy and Warren, that she should earn her own wheels instead of relying on their funding. They suggested she start a business.”

Check out her video interview and tour of the company in this video:

Weems is now 17 years old and the founder of Origami Owl a custom jewelry company. Here are some stats on this enterprising young woman:

  1.  After coming up with the idea she asked her parents to match the $350 baby sitting money she had invested in the company thus far.
  2. In 2010 Weems opened a kiosk at the Chandler, Arizona mall in time for Black Friday shoppers.
  3. The company adopted the direct sales platform in 2011 and generated about $280,000. The following year revenue took off like a rocket, multiplying 86 times.
  4.  Today they have 700 employees and are on track to generate $250 million in revenues.
  5. Her parents and other family members are employed in the business and she is still in school.

How did Isabella’s dream of getting a car turn out?

Well, she is now the proud owner of a white Jeep which she acquired in 2012 and named Alice.

How do you respond when your children ask for something. Do you automatically give them what they want? Are they the type who use tantrums to get their way? Or like Isabella’s parents do you encourage them to earn the funds for what they want?

I would love to hear your comments on this enterprising young woman who wouldn’t take “no” for an answer and turned $700 into a $250 million dollar business.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your employees, students, and social media tribe.  Help me spread the word!

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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Brian Wong founder of Kiip

I hear it everywhere I go. It’s part of book titles, employers are complaining about it, parents are saying it to each other, and the press tries to convince us of it.

They say “what’s wrong with young people today?”

As I write my Generational Differences in the Age of Social Media blog post to close out the year, I am reminded of this quotation from a very long time ago.

“The Earth is degenerating today. Bribery and corruption abound. Children no longer obey their parents, every man wants to write a book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.”  — Assyrian tablet, c. 2800 BC

I’ve been checking all year on the state of millennials so let me share some things I learned with you.

That said, I have one last thing to add and it brings me great joy in sharing this with you.  I rented a movie recently from Amazon about Silicon Valley and  the millennials.

One of the things I learned as I watched a movie was how many of the products taken for granted today are created by people under 30.

I’m not talking about the obvious ones we know about such as Zuckerberg for FaceBook, or the Twitter guys who just became instant billionaires. I’m talking about products that we use every day that we didn’t even realize were created by millennials.

Here are five of my favorites from the movie:

    1. Brian Wong, Founder of Kiip  was my favorite as his story is so compelling. Check out the video yourself and search for Kiip on YouTube to learn more.

Kiip Headquarters Tour

  1. Dropbox – Millions of business people use Dropbox every day and few know that it was created by a millennial.
  2. Vimeo –  used by millions to upload and share videos is another favorite of mine.
  3. inDinero.com – Accounting, Taxes and Payroll product is used by many businesses today
  4. Sound cloud – is the world’s largest community of artists, bands, podcasters and creators of music and audio

These are just some examples of the positive impact of today’s youth.  I encourage you to  just think about it and realize that today’s youngsters are not much different from the youngsters another century. People have been making these kinds of comments about the generations use for thousands of years. For example here’s what they said in the 8th century B.C.

“I see no hope for the future of our people if they are dependent on the frivolous youth of today, for certainly all youth are reckless beyond words. When I was a boy, we were taught to be discrete and respectful of elders, but the present youth are exceedingly wise and impatient of restraint.” — Hesiod, Eighth Century B.C

Luckily in our case there are many young people who, rather than sit around and complain, are inventing new ways for us to get things done efficiently.

That’s why I am closing out the year by focusing on our millennial creators. They are the future.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your employees, students, and social media tribe.  Help me spread the word!

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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While getting ready for my seminar I heard the news, “Psychologists To Bump The End Of Adolescence From 18 to 25.”

Yes, according to The Daily Mail “It is hoped the new guidelines being given to child psychologists will prevent children being ‘rushed’ through childhood.”

As a baby boomer it sent me back to my youth and the memory that age 18 was the age of consent. The end of your teen years represented the end of adolescence and once you reached the age of 21 you are expected to move out, to get a job, and was considered an adult.

I arrived in the United States from Jamaica when I was 17 years old, and moved out to be on my own by 18 years of age. I remember telling my mother “you’ve had your life, now let me alone to make my way and live my life.” I promised myself not to return home but to make it on my own no matter what.

Today’s youth were just sanctioned to live at home until at least age 25 years. If you are a business be prepared for immature unrealistic expectations from a group that were just told it’s OK to not take responsibility.

This video shows some more info about it.

 

Corporations may also expect to have more of the types of behavior that’s shown below. “Wearing glasses and a blazer, dancing at 4:30 a.m. in an empty newsroom to Kanye West, 25-year-old Marina Shifrin announced to her boss — and most of the Internet — that she was quitting her job at a Taiwanese animation company.”

Here is the informational video to her boss.

It’s quite confusing though as a judge recently found a 54-year-old teacher guilty of statutory rape but only sentenced to 30 days in jail because he felt the 14-year-old girl was sexually mature.

She later committed suicide before her 17th birthday. Although 10,000 people have signed a petition to recall the judge, he still considers what he did the right thing.

Fox news reported that according to a study in Australia “adolescence doesn’t end until age 28.”

So which is it? Age 25, 28, or will we soon change it to 30?

Personally, I ascribe to the adolescence ends at age 21 mindset. Push the birds out of the nest and let them learn self reliance, make mistakes and learn from them, then take control of their own destiny.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it with your employees, students, and social media tribe.  Help me spread the word!

Known as a highly effective teacher, public speaker, and communicator, Yvonne F. Brown has taught seminars on team building, leadership, communication, & management in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Yvonne is proficient in a variety of management topics, including interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural communications, conflict management skills, and helps employees with their career growth.

If you would like to connect with Yvonne you can follow her on Facebook, see her in action on YouTube, network with her on LinkedIn or via her corporate fan page JAD Communications

Listen to her radio show at Blog Talk Radio

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